hace 1 mes
1 602 notas

exhibition-ism:

Swooning over the mixed media, ball-point pen works of Nuria Riaza

hace 1 mes
675 notas

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard met during the filming of No Man of Her Own in 1932. Both at the time didn’t have any sparks outside the camera. But later that would change on February 7,1936, both attended a party at Jock Whitney’s house, to celebrate screenwriter Donald Ogden Stewart’s wife’s recent release from a sanitarium, jokingly called “The Nervous Breakdown Party”. Things did not start out well as Carole, as a joke, arrived in an ambulance. Attendants carried her on a stretcher and placed it in the middle of the room. Everyone gasped and gathered around. She jumped up, howling with laughter. Clark, there with Merle Oberon, was not amused and found the joke in poor taste. Clark and Carole got into a fight that ended with her stomping away from him, furiously proclaiming that he was a stuff shirt. Near the end of the party, Carole challenged Clark to a game of tennis. There they played, both in evening clothes, playing tennis until it was too dark to see (Carole beat him 8-0). Merle, irritated by being ignored, had someone else take her home and Clark didn’t even notice.A couple months later, at the annual Mayfair Ball, Clark and Carole shared a dance. Holding her close,Clark realized she wasn’t wearing any undergarments. Taking this as a green light, he suggested they leave the party and go back to his hotel together. Carole laughed and said, “Who do you think you are, Clark Gable?” This angered him and he left the party. The next morning he awoke to the sounds of birds cooing in his bedroom. Carole had convinced a hotel worker to put them in there while he slept. Tied to one of the birds was a note that said, “How about it? Carole” From that point on, they became inseparable. For the next three years, they were one of Hollywood’s most glamorous couples. They attended the Academy Awards together, premieres and were the number one topic of the press. Carole grew anxious for marriage. She wanted the title and she wanted children. Biding her time waiting for Clark’s wife Ria to get a divorce, Carole went house shopping. She and Clark jumped at the chance to own director Raoul Walsh’s twenty acre ranch in Encino. It was everything they had wanted. Carole wrote a check for $50,000 and the house was theirs. Renovations began and the couple waited until the day they could occupy the house as husband and wife. (x)
Clark Gable and Carole Lombard met during the filming of No Man of Her Own in 1932. Both at the time didn’t have any sparks outside the camera. But later that would change on February 7,1936, both attended a party at Jock Whitney’s house, to celebrate screenwriter Donald Ogden Stewart’s wife’s recent release from a sanitarium, jokingly called “The Nervous Breakdown Party”. Things did not start out well as Carole, as a joke, arrived in an ambulance. Attendants carried her on a stretcher and placed it in the middle of the room. Everyone gasped and gathered around. She jumped up, howling with laughter. Clark, there with Merle Oberon, was not amused and found the joke in poor taste. Clark and Carole got into a fight that ended with her stomping away from him, furiously proclaiming that he was a stuff shirt. Near the end of the party, Carole challenged Clark to a game of tennis. There they played, both in evening clothes, playing tennis until it was too dark to see (Carole beat him 8-0). Merle, irritated by being ignored, had someone else take her home and Clark didn’t even notice.

A couple months later, at the annual Mayfair Ball, Clark and Carole shared a dance. Holding her close,Clark realized she wasn’t wearing any undergarments. Taking this as a green light, he suggested they leave the party and go back to his hotel together. Carole laughed and said, “Who do you think you are, Clark Gable?” This angered him and he left the party. The next morning he awoke to the sounds of birds cooing in his bedroom. Carole had convinced a hotel worker to put them in there while he slept. Tied to one of the birds was a note that said, “How about it? Carole” From that point on, they became inseparable. For the next three years, they were one of Hollywood’s most glamorous couples. They attended the Academy Awards together, premieres and were the number one topic of the press. Carole grew anxious for marriage. She wanted the title and she wanted children. Biding her time waiting for Clark’s wife Ria to get a divorce, Carole went house shopping. She and Clark jumped at the chance to own director Raoul Walsh’s twenty acre ranch in Encino. It was everything they had wanted. Carole wrote a check for $50,000 and the house was theirs. Renovations began and the couple waited until the day they could occupy the house as husband and wife. (x)
hace 1 mes
94 notas
cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles talks to Huw Wheldon on the BBC show ‘Monitor’ (1960) about his work as actor, director and filmmaker, with clips from his films, ‘Citizen Kane’ and ‘The Magnificent Ambersons.’

Also, recommended viewing: Huw Wheldon interviews Orson Welles, Peter O’Toole and Ernest Milton in this epic discussion of ‘Hamlet’ on the same BBC show from 1963. At the time this programme was made, Peter O’Toole was enjoying his first taste of stardom, having been nominated for an Oscar for his leading role in David Lean’s masterpiece, ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’ During the same year (1963), he would also star as ‘Hamlet’ in the National Theatre’s inaugural performance, directed by Laurence Olivier. O’Toole’s stage credentials were impeccable, as he had been recruited to the Royal Shakespeare Company by Peter Hall at the tender age of 26.

Required viewing: a vintage interview captures the artist reflecting on ‘Citizen Kane’ and expounding on directing, acting and writing and his desire to bestow a valuable legacy upon his profession. The scene is a hotel room in Paris. The year 1960. The star, Orson Welles. This is a pearl of cinematic memorabilia.


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles talks to Huw Wheldon on the BBC show ‘Monitor’ (1960) about his work as actor, director and filmmaker, with clips from his films, ‘Citizen Kane’ and ‘The Magnificent Ambersons.’

Also, recommended viewing: Huw Wheldon interviews Orson Welles, Peter O’Toole and Ernest Milton in this epic discussion of ‘Hamlet’ on the same BBC show from 1963. At the time this programme was made, Peter O’Toole was enjoying his first taste of stardom, having been nominated for an Oscar for his leading role in David Lean’s masterpiece, ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’ During the same year (1963), he would also star as ‘Hamlet’ in the National Theatre’s inaugural performance, directed by Laurence Olivier. O’Toole’s stage credentials were impeccable, as he had been recruited to the Royal Shakespeare Company by Peter Hall at the tender age of 26.

Required viewing: a vintage interview captures the artist reflecting on ‘Citizen Kane’ and expounding on directing, acting and writing and his desire to bestow a valuable legacy upon his profession. The scene is a hotel room in Paris. The year 1960. The star, Orson Welles. This is a pearl of cinematic memorabilia.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

hace 1 mes
1 442 notas
introspectivenightmare:

Please don’t feed the ego, 
drawing by Daniel Johnston.

introspectivenightmare:

Please don’t feed the ego

drawing by Daniel Johnston.

hace 1 mes
239 notas

cinemaoftheworld:

Grand Central (2013) - dir. Rebecca Zlotowski | France

hace 1 mes
6 583 notas
raeoffrecord:

Still struggling with this one…and here’s the WIP again 

raeoffrecord:

Still struggling with this one…and here’s the WIP again 

hace 1 mes
326 notas
hace 1 mes
3 854 notas

the-overlook-hotel:

Frame from an unused take from The Shining. This alternate take of Wendy climbing the stairs of the Staff Wing was used in an American television commercial advertising The Shining upon its initial release.

The shot is interesting in that it features Wendy’s shadow with an outstretched, claw-like hand pose that is eerily reminiscent of a similar shot in F.W. Murnau’s classic 1922 horror film, Nosferatu.

Stanley Kubrick spoke about how he deliberately wanted to avoid the iconography of traditional gothic horror film in his design of the Overlook Hotel sets. Yet, during the climax of The Shining, he seems to readily embrace classic horror film images in both shots like this as well as the later scene where Wendy discovers cobwebbed skeletons in the hotel lobby.

hace 1 mes
39 notas

filmap:

Being There
Hal Ashby. 1979

Bitmore House
1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC 28801
See in map

See in imdb

hace 1 mes
1 288 notas

Stanley Kubrick — I started work on the screenplay with every intention of making the film a serious treatment of the problem of accidental nuclear war. As I kept trying to imagine the way in which things would really happen, ideas kept coming to me which I would discard because they were so ludicrous. I kept saying to myself: “I can’t do this. People will laugh.” But after a month or so I began to realize that all the things I was throwing out were the things which were most truthful. After all, what could be more absurd than the very idea of two mega-powers willing to wipe out all human life because of an accident, spiced up by political differences that will seem as meaningless to people a hundred years from now as the theological conflicts of the Middle Ages appear to us today? So it occurred to me that I was approaching the project in the wrong way. The only way to tell the story was as a black comedy or, better, a nightmare comedy, where the things you laugh at most are really the heart of the paradoxical postures that make a nuclear war possible.

Peter Sellers — One day Stanley suggested that I should wear a black glove, which would look rather sinister on a man in a wheelchair. “Maybe he had some injury in a nuclear experiment of some sort,” Kubrick said. So I put on the black glove and looked at the arm and I suddenly thought, “Hey, that’s a storm-tropper’s arm.” So instead of leaving it there looking malignant I gave the arm a life of its own. That arm hated the rest of the body for having made a compromise. That arm was a Nazi.

George C. Scott — Kubrick has a brilliant eye; he sees more than the camera does. He walks in in the morning and says, “This is awful!” and you get used to kicking things around. I used to kid him by saying, “I should’ve gotten the screen credit for Dr. Strangelove because I wrote half the goddam picture.” There’s no B.S. with him, no pomposity, no vanity. The refreshing thing is he hates everything… He is certainly in command, and he’s so self-effacing and apologetic it’s impossible to be offended by him.

Sterling Hayden — I had a terrible time the first day in front of the camera. I lost control and went 48 takes working with a cigar, chewing on a cigar, blowing my lines, and sweating. Finally, I couldn’t take it and went up to Stanley and apologized. I said, “I’m sorry.” He said the most beautiful thing: “Don’t be sorry. The terror on your face might just give us the quality we need. (He said, “Us.”) If it doesn’t work out, come back in six or eight weeks, and we’ll do the scenes then. Don’t worry about it.” I went back to my room with my wife, Kitty, got a little drunk that night, and had no more problem.

hace 1 mes
1 343 notas

Spider-woman by Alex Maleev

hace 1 mes
354 notas

ianbrooks:

'Round 'Laska photos by Ian Brooks

Thank you, Climate Change, for making the past month here in Alaska a balmy 70-ish degrees, and allowing me to get all these fantastic pictures. I just wanted to share some shots I’ve gotten over the last couple weeks during this gorgeous weather (and then, not so gorgeous as in the last picture when the city was engulfed in wildfire smoke). If you consider yourself a world traveler or someday wish to be, and Alaska is not on your list of places to visit before you shrug off this mortal coil, then perhaps you need to revise your list.

Other places to find me: Instagram / Twitter

hace 1 mes
42 642 notas

5ft1:

top: lost in translation, scarlett johannson, sofia coppola  

bottom: her, joaquin phoenix, spike jonze